Maybe I’m just old-fashioned, but I’m looking for the closest hole in the ground whenever a tornado is spotted in the area.

But these days, it seems like a whole lot of people immediately grab their smartphones and start filming as soon as a tornado starts to form.

Not that I’m complaining, though. I could sit and watch tornado footage for hours. Because as scary as tornadoes are, I’m fascinated by them.

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However, with that being said, I felt compelled to encourage folks to be safe.

Recent studies have found that people are moving to Texas at a higher rate than any other state. And for those who have recently moved here from a state that doesn’t have to deal with tornadoes, understand that they are extremely unpredictable.

While most move along a northeastern track, that’s not always the case. Sometimes tornadoes turn on a dime, trapping even the most experienced storm chasers.

So, always take heed of the warnings put out by the Emergency Alert System:

  • Move indoors immediately
  • Go to the lowest and most inner part of the structure
  • Stay informed via local media

It’s not even spring yet and we’ve already seen a lot of severe weather in the area, including several tornadoes that touched down back on Thursday, March 2. So be careful out there and keep an eye on the sky and heed the warnings of your local media.

KEEP READING: What to do after a tornado strikes

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